a PhD is not enough

science fiction to reality

Here’s your weekly dose of treats 💌

A weekly list of goodies curated by Robert.

Want to send me stuff to read? Dump your link in this form.
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🎶 Something to listen to while reading

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Fiery and stuff I’ve been ingesting

1.

Balaji on How to Fix the Media, Cloud Communities & Crypto

He talks about the current issues with the media and how he's hoping to fix it with crypto and the blockchain. We also get a look at how he views the world, what motivates him, what he's been wrong about as well as the massive shifts he sees happening.

2.

Facebook AI: Shedding light on fairness in AI with a new data set

A resource for Machine Learning. Facebook AI has built and open-sourced a new, unique data set called Casual Conversations, consisting of 45,186 videos of participants having nonscripted conversations.

It serves as a tool for AI researchers to surface useful signals that may help them evaluate the fairness of their computer vision and audio models across subgroups of age, gender, apparent skin tone, and ambient lighting. To our knowledge, it’s the first publicly available data set featuring paid individuals who explicitly provided their age and gender themselves — as opposed to information labeled by third parties or estimated using ML models.

3.

Tech keeps trying to ‘fix’ recipe sites. Food bloggers wish they’d stop.

Nobody loves the way food blogs work right now. But developers keep missing the point when they try to make them better.

"Your favorite recipes without the ads or life stories." That was the tagline for a site called Recipeasly when it launched in February. In its first iteration, the site was simple: People could paste in a URL from a food blog or website, and Recipeasly would spit back just the ingredients and steps required to make the dish, with no extraneous design or ads. People could save their favorites and come back to them later.

4.

Human Development Index (HDI)

The HDI was created to emphasize that people and their capabilities should be the ultimate criteria for assessing the development of a country, not economic growth alone. The HDI can also be used to question national policy choices, asking how two countries with the same level of GNI per capita can end up with different human development outcomes. These contrasts can stimulate debate about government policy priorities.

5.

Illuminated Manuscripts – Growing & harvesting flowers, nuts, herbs, fruits & vegetables in 1400s. The TacuinumSanitatis is a lavishly illustrated medieval handbook on health largely focusing on the growing & preparation of food, based on the Taqwim al‑sihha تقويم الصحة ("Maintenance of Health"), an 11th-century Arab medical treatise by Ibn Butlan of Baghdad. These manuscripts were first commissioned by northern Italian nobility during the last decades of the14th century.

6.

Regular survey on US teenagers by Piper Sandler's
Almost 90% have an iPhone.
Nike is the no. 1 fashion brand.
Teens spend (32%) of their daily video consumption on Netflix followed by YouTube (31%)

7.

The Cactus and the Weasel

8.


Creepy webcam shaped like a human eye
The device looks like an incredibly realistic eyeball, complete with surrounding flesh, eyelids, and an eyebrow. Inside is a series of six servo motors that allow it to gaze around the room and emote, under the control of an Arduino Nano. The Eyecam also includes a tiny HD camera, which is fed into a Raspberry Pi Zero to be recognized by a computer as a plug-and-play webcam. 

9.

A PhD Is Not Enough!: A Guide to Survival in Science (PDF)

For those who think that having a PhD will allow you to instantly morph into a god-like creature, remember: PhD also stands for Pizza Hut Delivery. And there's nothing wrong with delivering pizza. But one should pay attention to the drones up in the sky coming to take your job.

*Snip snip*
These thoughts have been on my mind ever since I almost had to tell Mom and Dad that their golden boy was not good enough to find a permanent (or any!) job in physics, a job for which his qualifications included eight years of higher education and four more of postdoctoral work. The agony of those days is not easily forgotten—the boy with the high IQ, who had skipped a grade, graduated from the Bronx High School of Science at 16 and from Columbia summa cum laude at 20, found himself in a muddle at 20. How do you choose a research problem? How do you give a talk? What do you do to persuade a university or a national or industrial lab to hire and keep you? I hadn’t a clue until, midway through my second postdoctoral job, I had the good fortune to spend some months collaborating with a young professor who cared whether I survived as a scientist. Although this mentoring relationship was brief, it helped me acquire a set of skills that graduate education did not, skills without which my lengthy training in physics would have been wasted.

10.

Tools for Designers | May, 2021

From dev tools to productivity to a little bit of fun with sudoku, this month’s collection of new tools is packed with something for everyone.


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🐦 Tweets for thought

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Thank you for reading 🤜🤛

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That said, how’re you and yours doing this week? Any major changes to your status quo, or are things fairly locked-in and predictable at the moment?

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Have a great day ahead!

With 💛 from Romania.

Robert